Sultan Abu Bakar Mosque

Sultan Abu Bakar Mosque is one of the most famous landmarks in Johor Bahru. Constructed between 1892 and 1900 and named after the person who commissioned it, Almarhum Sultan Abu Bakar, its architecture is influenced by Moorish design. It’s blue roofing and black tipped minarets grab the attention of many motorists plying Jalan Skudai.

Masjid Sultan Abu Bakar (by azmeen)

The mosque faces Lido Beach; the Malaysian side of the Johor Strait. Nested on top of a hill, the compounds of Sultan Abu Bakar Mosque offers a wonderful elevated view of Singapore.

Masjid Sultan Abu Bakar (by azmeen)

The mosque’s building is almost a perfect square and its trims, pillars and arches are very detailed and sports obvious European influences. The design of Sultan Abu Bakar Mosque is attributed to Haji Mohamed Arif Bin Punak and its construction is spearheaded by Dato’ Yahya Bin Awalluddin.

Masjid Sultan Abu Bakar (by azmeen)

The mosque is one of the largest in Johor and can easily accommodate around 3000 worshippers. Lots of religious and social activities are held in Sultan Abu Bakar Mosque, including sermons, Quran lessons and Muslim wedding solemnizations (akad nikah).

Masjid Sultan Abu Bakar (by azmeen)

Although non-Muslims are not permitted into the mosque, visitors are welcomed to explore the compounds of the mosque. It’s unique architecture and idyllic surroundings make it a must visit location for engineering enthusiasts as well as photographers.

Masjid Sultan Abu Bakar External Corridor (by azmeen)

4 responses to “Sultan Abu Bakar Mosque”.

  1. Onn Ibrahim Says:

    So you made the return trip to the mosque. This is the first time I have seen anyone take pictures of the structure like you did. Syabas! Informative and concise. The important thing is that many of us have our moulding childhood experiences there. Your pictures are good karma and by God’s permission will soften the hearts of true believers to want to take a peek inside, and again, through His Permission, perform an act of gratitude and remembrance for allowing the Visitors or Wayfarers intention to see one of his constructed reality, a Real Beauty, one we can actually behold with our senses. The last shot through the opening gaps in the covered extension gives us a glimpse of Islamic archtecture but promises the viewer with knowledge a connection between ground and sky, between earth and heavens, as the Chinese would say. Love the shot fellow Johorean. Your contribution will be recognised. Thank you.

  2. Onn Ibrahim Says:

    Correction: the last shot posese many meanings in accordance with the knowledge gifted by God to the viewer. It was taken through a pergola and the both the geometric shapes of opening and pond provides a symmetry of effects which lifts the uncommon spirit n God Willing, an eye into our soul. The Islamic term for all these is encompassed in ish, then ihsan, and these are all about love.

  3. Onn Ibrahim Says:

    Correction of last entry’s typos: “The last shot poses many meanings in accordance with the knowledge gifted by God to the viewer. Scoped through the pergola, both the geometric shapes of the pergola’s opening creates a contrast of the reflected white blue sky aginst the mirror stillness of the pond, provides a symmetry of effects which lifts the uncommon spirit and God Willing, an eye into our soul. The Islamic term for all these is encompassed in ish, then ihsan, and these are all about love.

  4. Kay Kastum Says:

    Indeed a masterpiece!