Do Others’ Mistakes Make You Angry?

One lesson in life that I’m still grappling with is the act for accepting and forgiving mistakes. Often I find myself making a big fuss over someone’s mistake. Don’t become like me, it’s not good for your health (both physical and mental). Please continue reading to find out why.

Have you ever woke up in the morning and thought, “Hmmm… what a lovely day! I think I want to make three mistakes today.” So far, I’ve yet to find a person who does. Mistakes are exactly that; mistakes. Nobody ever wants to make a mistake, it just happens! There’s no such thing as a mistake made on purpose. That, my friend, is called sabotage.

If you chose to be aggressive towards somebody who made a mistake, there are implications to both him and you. He will feel stressed out, demotivated and probably even angry. You too will feel angry and irritated, you’d probably even be shouting to him. Both of you will probably experience chemical reactions in your bodies that could lead to heart complications, strained vocal chords, not to mention emotional distress.

Is this what you really want to achieve with your reaction to the mistake?

A more positive way to handle the situation would probably be to take a minute to analyze the situation. Sit down, calm yourself and replay the scenario in your head. Recall what instructions you communicated to the person who made the mistake. Did you yourself make a mistake?

Sometimes it’s easier to blame the person who executed an instruction incorrectly even when it’s really your instructions that’s flawed.

When you’ve got some time to see a clearer picture of the whole incident, discuss the situation with the person. Tell him that he did not perform what was expected of him. Ask him on why the situation turned out that way. Most importantly, listen closely to what he has to say. Take note of turning points that contributed to the mistakes.

Once he has finished with his explanation, then inform the person that you’re unhappy with his performance because you have high confidence and expectations towards him. Highlight the important points that developed into the mistakes and your suggestion on how to address similar situations in the future. Complete the heart to heart talk by reaffirming your faith in him and make it clear that you expect him to perform better in similar situations.

Just by doing this you handled the situation in a more civilized and mutually beneficial manner. Unnecessary stress is avoided and both parties gained priceless experience in human to human relations. Furthermore, the person who made the mistake will be more determined to avoid making similar mistake and effectively not disappoint you. Isn’t this a winning combination?

So the next time you ask your nephew to go to the store and buy for you some cologne and cleansers but he came back with a colon cleanse kit instead, remember this post and react accordingly 🙂

Only one response to “Do Others’ Mistakes Make You Angry?” so far.

  1. papajoneh Says:

    Nicely written. Take a deep deep breath, exhale slooowwwly. Yes that works when things you expected to work, does not. Want to get angry also cannot, useless. LOL.