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Court: Copyright Infringer Must Use Windows

Scott McCausland was convicted of illegally downloading one of the Star Wars series some time in 2005. He’s now under probation after serving five months in prison.

A condition of his probation includes him consenting to periodic checks on his computer by a probation officer and/or monitoring software. McCausland in not against this, but apparently the monitoring software only supports Windows and not McCausland’s current OS, Ubuntu Linux:

“I am consenting to all of it, but it just so happens that the OS I use might not be supported by the software they use to monitor. So I do not feel (neither does my lawyer) that the government can force me to switch OS.”

McCausland has now started an appeal on his website to cover the cost of buying Windows.

So what’s a pirate to do in this situation? Launch a “Windows Tip Jar Campaign” of course 😛

BitTorrent Going Closed Source?

I guess you can say that the writing has been on the wall for quite some time:

  1. First came the license switch from MIT to the now dead BitTorrent Open Source License
  2. Next came the portalification process

Now, after BitTorrent Inc’s recent acquisition of uTorrent, a closed source BitTorrent client, it seems that even the future of the BitTorrent protocol itself is becoming blurred.

The answers provided by Ashwin Navin, President of BitTorrent, Inc. in response to the questions asked by Slyck News begs more questions rather than answer them.

Heck, even BitTorrent’s Trademark Use Guidelines page contains vague (obsolete?) information. Take this second paragraph, for example:

Our Open Source License (www.bittorrent.com/license.html) does not grant any rights to use of our marks. In order to insure the identity and reliability of our technology throughout the internet community, especially because the BITTORRENT client is open source, it is important that everyone who wants to use our trademarks understands and follows our usage policies, which we will update from time to time. We appreciate your assistance in helping to insure that BitTorrent’s marks, such as BITTORRENT, TORRENT, and our logo, continue to represent our innovative technology. In order to insure the identity and reliability of our technology throughout the internet community, especially because the BITTORRENT client is open source, it is important that everyone who wants to use our trademarks understands and follows our usage policies, which we will update from time to time.

I no longer see any link to the BitTorrent license throughout the BitTorrent web site. Even the link quoted above no longer exists.

I hear cries of Fork!” in the background. Do you?